Duluth Arts and Entertainment Events Add An Event

Styx and REO Speedwagon with special guest Don Felder

  • Date: March 13, 2018
  • Time: 7:00pm
  • Address:
    350 Harbor Dr.
    Duluth, MN 55802
  • Cost: From $27.50 to $97.50

Buy tickets for this event

Upcoming Events for Don Felder

Don Felder is renowned as the former lead guitarist of The Eagles, one of the most popular and influential rock groups of our time. The band's record-setting compilation Their Greatest Hits (1971-1975) sold over 29 million copies in the U.S. alone and was awarded by the RIAA the top-selling album of the 20th Century. A member of The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame since 1998, Felder served as a key member of The Eagles for 27 years, putting his mark on numerous Eagles milestones. Felder originated and co-wrote The Eagles' biggest hit - the iconic, Grammy-studded smash "Hotel California" - along with fan favorites like "Victim of Love" and "Those Shoes." He became immediately celebrated for his lyrical, signature guitar work on legendary songs like "Life in the Fast Lane," "One of These Nights," "New Kid In Town," and numerous more.

After leaving that group in 2001, Felder also became a New York Times bestselling author when his riveting confessional memoir Heaven and Hell: My Life in The Eagles proved a major commercial triumph upon publication in 2008.

Growing up in the Gainesville, FL local music scene, Don Felder would incongruously encounter a number of the greatest talents that would go on to change rock and roll history. In high school, he formed a band with a young Stephen Stills; Felder also gave guitar lessons to a teenaged Tom Petty at the local music store, and The Allman Brothers were also local pals. "Duane Allman was first person I ever saw play electric-slide guitar," Felder recalls. "I said, ‘You've got to show me how to do that,' so we sat on his mother's floor in Daytona Beach and Duane taught me how to play slide." Florida is also where a young Felder would first meet Bernie Leadon, a founding member of The Eagles who would be instrumental in bringing his childhood friend into the band. In fact, it was Leadon who encouraged him to come out to Los Angeles, where Felder found himself working both with The Eagles and in both sessions and live performances for numerous music legends spanning the musical spectrum: The Bee Gees, Bob Seger, Michael Jackson, Alice Cooper, Kenny Loggins, David Crosby, Graham Nash, Boz Scaggs, Warren Zevon, Joni Mitchell, Stevie Nicks, Vince Gill, Stevie Wonder, Elton John, Paul Simon, Diana Ross, Barbra Streisand - and even and old friend, Steven Stills. "On some level, Bernie is really responsible for all this craziness," Felder laughs.

Putting all the tumult and glory he'd experienced to that point into perspective gave new urgency to the creation of Road to Forever - only Felder's second solo effort in a storied, four-decade-plus sojourn through rock history. Road to Forever represents the culmination of a personal journey of introspection that Felder began over ten years ago. In 2001, he suffered an emotionally-devastating double blow - separating acrimoniously from The Eagles for the last time while facing the end of his first marriage, which had lasted 29 years and produced four children. "Every identity I'd been attached to - musician, husband, and father - was being taken away," he says. To heal, Felder began writing down as many memories as he could, putting his past in perspective. Finding these musings compelling, Felder was inspired to write a book, and connected with legendary Hollywood deal-maker Michael Ovitz to set it up. "Two weeks later, I went to New York with a three-page synopsis, and received four offers from publishers," Felder says. "Now I was forced to reflect on my life." That introspection inspired him to "write out the stories of my life as songs. After I collected myself, I found I needed to go out and play music again, and that's how I began recording the upcoming album.

"Who would ever thought that a guitar player from Gainesville would go on to be in The Eagles, and then become a best-selling author?" Felder continues. I had to figure all that out for myself, and I'm glad that I did. In the process of making the upcoming album, I found out who I really am - I had to find out what happened when I almost lost it all."

Upcoming Events for REO Speedwagon

REO Speedwagon - Kevin Cronin (lead vocals, guitar). Bruce Hall (bass), Neal Doughty (keyboards), Dave Amato (lead guitar) and Bryan Hitt (drums) - are ready to roll into 2007 full throttle with their brand new album FIND YOUR WAY HOME, their first studio collection of new material in more than a decade.

The roots of the new album go back to the spring of 2000, when the band joined forces with fellow Medwest rockers Styx for a national, sold-out, co-headlining tour. The tour proved to be such a commercial success that it was recorded live and released on both CD and DVD, jokingly entitled "Arch Allies". The bands appeared together on the Today show, VH1, and on numerous syndicated radio shows, including The Howard Stern Show.

Upcoming Events for Styx

STYX - Tommy Shaw, James "JY" Young, Lawrence Gowan, Todd Sucherman and Ricky Phillips (along with the occasional surprise appearance by original bassist Chuck Panozzo), have performed more live since '99 than all of the previous years of its career combined. Two Super-Bowl appearances, Pollstar Box Office chart-topping tours with Def Leppard, Journey, Boston, REO Speedwagon, Bad Company (to name only a few), two more studio albums and no end in sight, STYX continues to conquer the planet, one venue at a time.

Spawned from a suburban Chicago basement in the early '70s, Styx would eventually transform into the virtual arena rock prototype by the late '70s and early '80s, due to a fondness for big rockers and soaring power ballads.

Early on, Styx's music reflected such then-current prog rockers as Emerson, Lake & Palmer and the Moody Blues, as evidenced by such releases as 1972's self-titled debut, 1973's Styx II, 1974's The Serpent Is Rising, and 1975's Man of Miracles. While the albums (as well as non-stop touring) helped the group build a substantial following locally, Styx failed to break through to the mainstream, until a track originally from their second album, "Lady" started to get substantial airplay in late '74 on the Chicago radio station WLS-FM. The song was soon issued as a single nationwide, and quickly shot to number six on the singles chart, as Styx II was certified gold. By this time, however, the group had grown disenchanted with their record label, and opted to sign on with A&M for their fifth release overall, 1975's Equinox (their former label would issue countless compilations over the years, culled from tracks off their early releases). On the eve of the tour in support of the album, original guitarist John Curulewski abruptly left the band, and was replaced by Tommy Shaw. Shaw proved to be the missing piece of the puzzle for Styx, as most of their subsequent releases throughout the late '70s earned at least platinum certification (1976's Crystal Ball, 1977's The Grand Illusion, 1978's Pieces of Eight, and 1979's Cornerstone), and spawned such hit singles and classic rock radio standards as "Come Sail Away," "Renegade," "Blue Collar Man" and "Fooling Yourself."

The band decided that their first release of the '80s would be a concept album, 1981's Paradise Theater, which was loosely based on the rise and fall of a once-beautiful theater (which was supposedly used as a metaphor for the state of the U. S. at the time -- the Iranian hostage situation, the Cold War, Reagan, etc.). Paradise Theater became Styx's biggest hit of their career (selling over three million copies in a three-year period), as they became one of the U. S. top rock acts due to such big hit singles as "Too Much Time on My Hands". It also marked the first time in history that a band released four consecutive triple-platinum albums.

A career-encompassing live album, Caught in the Act, was issued in 1984, before Styx went on hiatus, and the majority of its members pursued solo projects throughout the remainder of the decade. A re-recording of their early hit, "Lady" (titled "Lady" '95"), for a Greatest Hits compilation, finally united Shaw with his former Styx bandmates, which led to a full-on reunion tour in 1996. But drummer John Panozzo fell seriously ill at the time (due to a long struggle with alcoholism), which prevented him from joining the proceedings -- as he passed away in July of the same year. Although grief-stricken, Styx persevered with new drummer Todd Sucherman taking the place of Panozzo, as the Styx reunion tour became a surprise sold-out success, resulting in the release of a live album/video, 1997's "Return to Paradise," while a whole new generation of rock fans were introduced to the grandiose sounds of Styx via a humorous car ad which used the track "Mr. Roboto," as well as songs used in such TV shows as South Park and Freaks & Geeks.

20 million people rely on AmericanTowns each year to find & share local information