Dallas - Crow Collection Of Asian Art

2010 Flora Street
214-979-6430

Mission:

The Trammell & Margaret Crow Collection of Asian Art shall honor the vision, generosity of spirit and collecting tradition of Trammell and Margaret Crow. Mr. and Mrs. Crow’s love of the applied arts of Asia shall be communicated to the general public by exhibiting, preserving, collecting, interpreting and researching original works of art. The museum shall strive for maximum visitorship. Through innovative programs, the museum shall work to advance an understanding of the meanings and values embodied in the Asian artistic traditions.

History:

Trammell and Margaret Crow bought their first piece of Asian art in the mid-1960s. From that initial purchase, a distinguished collection of Asian art has evolved. The collection features pieces from China, Japan, India, Korea and Southeastern Asia spanning from historical to contemporary.

In December, 1998, the Crow Family opened the Trammell and Margaret Crow Collection of Asian Art as a permanent museum at 2010 Flora Street in the Arts District of Dallas, Texas. Mr. and Mrs. Crow opened the free museum in an effort to share their love of Asian art and culture with the general public. The museum’s mission is to bridge the cultural gap between East and West. The Crows traveled extensively throughout the world, but Asia was always a favorite destination. “Our first visit to China came in 1976 right before Chairman Mao Zedong died,” Mrs. Crow said. “Very few foreigners were allowed inside China at that time, but we received permission because of Dallas Market Center’s involvement with the Canton Trade Fair.”

“Trammell always loved Chinese art – it fascinated him, especially jade,” Mrs. Crow said. “And I’ve always appreciated English décor, which has been influenced by the Chinese for centuries. So it was very easy for us to develop this partnership — this love for Asian Art.” Tight restrictions on Chinese exports prevented the Crows from making many direct buys of art during their 14 subsequent visits to the country. The majority of their collection has been obtained from individual purchases made through private dealers and auction houses and through the acquisition of major collections, such as the highly respected Morrie A. Moss collection.

Eventually the Crow family retained Asian art expert, Clarence Shangraw to evaluate their collection. After extensive analysis by Shangraw, who was with the Asian Art Museum in San Francisco at that time, 569 of the best pieces were selected for inclusion in the Crow Collection’s permanent collection. Soon pieces from Japan, India and other Southeast Asian counties were added as the Crows expanded their travels. During this time, the couple’s children began to develop an interest in art. Son Trammell S. Crow was particularly attracted to Asian art. His interest was spurred while studying Chinese religion and history at Yale University. He now serves as president of the Crow Family Foundation and oversees the development of the Crow Collection.

Mrs. Crow said the art – which ranges from Chinese jades and Buddhist sculpture to Japanese crystal spheres and screen paintings – has been displayed extensively at different properties owned by the Crow family, including hotels and office buildings as well as in the many homes of the Crow family. A baradari, a gazebo used in gardens of Indian palaces and residences for relaxation and meditation, spent years on the lakeshore at the family’s farm in East Texas before its selection into the collection.

The Hilton Anatole Hotel in Dallas is home to many of the Crow family’s acquisitions including wall tapestries, elephant sculptures and jade displayed in cabinets throughout the hotel. “Because the art was scattered between commercial buildings and our homes, we had little notion of what kind of a collection we had until pieces were gathered for the exhaustive selection process,” Mrs. Crow said.

Eventually the Crow family retained Asian art expert, Clarence Shangraw to evaluate their collection. After extensive analysis by Shangraw, who was with the Asian Art Museum in San Francisco at that time, 569 of the best pieces were selected for inclusion in the Crow Collection’s permanent collection. Soon pieces from Japan, India and other Southeast Asian counties were added as the Crows expanded their travels. During this time, the couple’s children began to develop an interest in art. Son Trammell S. Crow was particularly attracted to Asian art. His interest was spurred while studying Chinese religion and history at Yale University. He now serves as president of the Crow Family Foundation and oversees the development of the Crow Collection.

Mrs. Crow said the art – which ranges from Chinese jades and Buddhist sculpture to Japanese crystal spheres and screen paintings – has been displayed extensively at different properties owned by the Crow family, including hotels and office buildings as well as in the many homes of the Crow family. A baradari, a gazebo used in gardens of Indian palaces and residences for relaxation and meditation, spent years on the lakeshore at the family’s farm in East Texas before its selection into the collection.

The Hilton Anatole Hotel in Dallas is home to many of the Crow family’s acquisitions including wall tapestries, elephant sculptures and jade displayed in cabinets throughout the hotel. “Because the art was scattered between commercial buildings and our homes, we had little notion of what kind of a collection we had until pieces were gathered for the exhaustive selection process,” Mrs. Crow said.



Reviews

Sam Shah

Rating:
Thursday, Jan. 4, 2018
This place is awesome! Total hidden gem, and way more worthwhile than the Dallas Museum of Art nearby. It's free, has excellent staff and some really cool pieces. The only drawback is that it's fairly small and most of the exhibits above the ground floor are closed.

kyle honea

Rating:
Thursday, Feb. 8, 2018
Highly advised, especially if you have a serious interest in asian artifacts. Nothing but high quality pieces here. It's a family friendly environment as well and never too crowded or anything like that. The fact that it is indeed "free" makes it all the more enjoyable.

Chrisrina Madera

Rating:
Monday, Feb. 19, 2018
The crow museum is a hidden gem in Dallas, often over looked by museum goers headed next door to the Nasher and DMA. If you're in the area take the time to stop at the Crow! It has great exhibits, a wonderfully preserved collection, and pieces that you can't see anywhere else. Be sure to walk down the street a bit to their gift shop too, because they sell all kinds of goodies there including relatively cheap pieces by their up and coming artists in residence!

Angela VonSchmittou

Rating:
Monday, Jan. 15, 2018
Their hours changed so we showed up about 30 minutes before closing, but we still had time to go through the museum. One floor was closed for renovations, so I took my time on the first floor while my kids and husband rushed through the first and third floors. In 30 minutes, I got to read most of the plaques for the items on the first floor, which was Japanese art. The employees were very friendly and it was free to get in. So, even though the museum is small, it is a must-see and good experience.

Jacob Ira Anderson

Rating:
Monday, March 19, 2018
With the renovations, there really isn't a lot there. I'll admit it was interesting, but wait until they open the upper level back up

Recent News

Exhibition - India: Art, Time, Place

This exhibition presents a selection of choice works from the Museum’s permanent collection of art from India, focusing on a few significant time periods and geographic areas. The exhibition’s earliest period of focus is Gandhara, part of the ove…

Read More »

Java in July

Escape the heat and enjoy the shade and serenity of the Crow Collection of Asian Art Sculpture Garden. On this Indonesian-themed night, create your own traditional Indonesian puppet, learn about Indonesian textiles, and relax the night away by watchi…

Read More »