Dallas - Morton H. Meyerson Symphony Center

2301 Flora Street
214-670-3600

About:

The Morton H. Meyerson Symphony Center was created as a response to the citizens of Dallas desiring a major facility for cultural activities and gatherings, and the Dallas Symphony Orchestra’s need for a new home. A public/private partnership ensued between the City of Dallas and the Dallas Symphony Association, which led efforts to raise a major portion of the needed funds. In September 1989 a new era in the cultural life of Dallas began with the opening of the Meyerson Symphony Center.

The Meyerson Symphony Center is an optimal space for concerts, meetings, lectures, receptions, weddings, and similar events. The Center is owned and operated by the City of Dallas Office of Cultural Affairs and is named fo Morton H. Meyerson, the former president of Electronic Data Systems (EDS). EDS founder Ross Perot offered a major gift to ensure the building met the high standards set by its internationally renowned design team: architect I. M. Pei and acoustician Russell Johnson of Artec Consultants. Perot chose to honor his friend and colleague by naming the building for Meyerson, who chaired the original building committee and was instrumental in making the Center a reality. The concert hall is named for Eugene McDermott, co-founder of Texas Instruments. The designation was given in response to a significant gift from the Eugene McDermott Foundation in honor of his memory.



Reviews

J T

Rating:
Wednesday, Feb. 28, 2018
Amazing acoustics. There isn't a bad seat in the house, both aurally and visually. The symphony hall was carefully designed to ensure that even in the Grand Tier, you get great sound. The organ is world class, and so is the orchestra and chorus. The concerts presented are a good mix of traditional favorites and lesser heard works with frequent guest conductors and soloists from around the world. There is an underground parking garage and valet parking during concerts. Bring cash for parking, most recently $15. There's also a symphony store for souvenirs open during concerts as well as a delicious, somewhat expensive restaurant available before some concerts. You can check with the ticket office if you're interested. The Meyerson is situated in the Arts District.

Alyssa Grey

Rating:
Saturday, March 10, 2018
A beautiful concert hall. The Meyerson is one of the best sounding concert halls in the United States. It especially features the wonderful choir of the symphony, the Dallas Symphony Chorus. If you have a chance, watch a show with the choir as well. This orchestra has really developed into a national influence over the last ten years.

Geoffrey Villalba

Rating:
Thursday, March 1, 2018
The Meyerson is truly one of Dallas's best attractions. Whether you're passing by on vacation or a permanent Dallas resident, the Meyerson Symphony Center will always have events that are both exciting and inspiring. Watching the DSO perform is an experience you don't want to miss out on! For those wondering about dress code I would say business casual at least but you can comfortably go all out with dress attire.

André Gonçalves

Rating:
Monday, Feb. 12, 2018
Hall with excellent acoustics if you know where to sit. I would avoid the loges, unless you can get the central ones in the back. My preference is the middle section of the orchestra floor, right in the middle due to sound stage. Starting with row J until M, since I like an immediate sound with well defined sound stage that is enhanced by the hall itself. For those who like a lot of the hall and less definition in favor of a more euphonic presentation I recommend going further to the back.

Emily Skeen

Rating:
Wednesday, April 11, 2018
Went here to see the Dallas Winds for John Williams and it was a very nice venue and an absolutely amazing concert. The organ is stunning behing the stage! I sat in the luge boxes and the seating was a little ambiguous, not only to me but to five other people in my box. It wasnt till halfway through that someone came around to actually check and we were all in the wrong place!