Historical Markers

Cincinnati Reds

Marker is at the intersection of Main Street and West 2nd Street, on the left when traveling south on Main Street.

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The Church / The Founder

Marker is on Salem Road.

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Garard/Martin Station, 1790

Marker is on Elstun Road.

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John James Audubon in Cincinnati


The Cincinnati Museum of Natural History is part of Cincinnati Museum Center. The Western Museum Society, organized by Dr. Daniel Drake in 1818, preceded it. The Western Museum Society's collection was built around ornithology, fossil zoology, geology, and Native American artifacts. The Museum's first taxidermist, John James Audubon, was hired in the winter of 1819 to do taxidermy, build collections, and create exhibits. Audubon supplemented his income by drawing portraits, teaching art, and running his own drawing academy. During his brief stay in Cincinnati, Audubon created five paintings of local birds that were among the first contributions to his acclaimed Birds of North America. He left Cincinnati in 1820 to travel and finish his collection of drawings that would make him one of North America's most revered and famous nineteenth century artists.

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Site of Home Field of First Pro Baseball Team


The first professional baseball team, the 1869 Cincinnati Red Stockings, played their home games on this site in a ballpark called Union Grounds. The facility included a main grandstand (nicknamed the “Grand Duchess”), two wings of bleacher seats down each baseline, and a clubhouse. Seating capacity was approximately 4,000, but as many as 12,000 were estimated to have filled the grounds for important games. The grounds were 550 feet square and were surrounded by a large fence.

Union Grounds opened in 1867 and hosted its first game on July 5th. After the Red Stockings disbanded in 1870, and with the owners of the club facing bankruptcy, the wooden stands and fence were dismantled and sold as scrap in 1872.

The ballpark was bounded by Kenner Street (to the north) and Hopkins Street (to the south). The main grandstand and home plate were located near this landmark and faced the northwest.

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Cincinnati Union Terminal


The Cincinnati Union Terminal opened in March 1933 and integrated rail travel in the city, which previously operated from five separate passenger terminals. Built when rail travel was already in decline, Union Terminal stopped operating as a passenger railroad station in 1972. Only during WWII was the terminal used to capacity with as many as 34,000 people travelling through the building daily in 1944. As part of preservation efforts, 14 mosaics depicting Cincinnati industry of the 1930s by Winold Reiss were saved from the concourse and moved to the Greater Cincinnati Airport. The restored Union Terminal became a Museum Center in November 1990 with the opening of the renovated Cincinnati Museum of Natural History and new Cincinnati History Museum. Cincinnati Union Terminal has been described as one of the most outstanding examples of Art Deco train stations in the nation and was listed on National Register of Historic Places in 1972.

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The Betts House, 1804

Marker is on Clark Street, on the right when traveling west.

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First National Correctional Congress / Declaration of Principles of 1870

Marker is at the intersection of Central Avenue and W. 5th Street (U.S. 27), on the right when traveling south on Central Avenue.

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Gaines High School / Peter H. Clark

Marker is at the intersection of Court Street and John Street, on the right when traveling west on Court Street.

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Lytle's Surroundings


Time has changed much of Lytle's surroundings. These handsome townhouses which stood on East Fourth Street were residences of many of Cincinnati's most prominent citizens. Most of the homes became service and civic clubs in the 20th Century and were joined in 1925 by the Phelps Apartment Building. All but the Phelps and the Literary Club were town down in 1967 to make way for the modern apartment complex at 550 East Fourth Street.

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