Troy Skating Club

Troy Skating Club
255 Adams Street
937-339-8521


History

Hobart Arena was built in 1950 and a family skate group was organized to skate one night a week in 1951. In 1952 separate adult and children's sessions were organized. The Troy Skating Club became a member club of the United States Figure Skating Association, which is the governing body of figure skating and a member of the International Skating Union (ISU), the body that governs the sport of figure skating and speed skating internationally.

The purpose of the Troy Skating Club is to encourage the instruction, practice, tests and advancement of the members in all forms of skating and to encourage and cultivate a spirit of fraternal feeling among ice skaters, to sponsor, produce or cooperate in the production of amateur ice shows and host competitions.

In 1954 the Troy Skating Club produced its first ice show starring Carol (Heiss Jenkins) and Nancy Heiss. The club's first test session was held in 1954 and lasted two days. Troy Skating Club was encouraged to continue during those years by E.A. Hobart and John Bothe, the later of whom actively skated.

1958 brought the first Midwestern Championships to Troy. We also held our first summer skating school, which was frequented for many years by skaters from all over the country, being one of the few skating summer schools in the country.

Midwesterns were held again in 1961 and 1970. Also, in that year Frederick C. LeFevre was elected president of the USFSA. His wife Virginia was a valued World and International judge while son, John, served USFSA as Executive Director. Former Trojan, James Disbrow, served the USFSA as president until his death in 2002. Currently, Kathy Slack of Troy most recently served on the 15 member USFS Board of Directors as Membership Development Coordinator in charge of Membership and Program Development.

The first annual Troy Summer Competition was held in 1974 and just held it's 37th annual competition in July 2012. Troy can no longer hold qualifying competitions, as they have become so large that it requires two ice surfaces.


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