Wolf Trap Foundation For The Performing Arts

1645 Trap Road
703-255-1900

Wolf Trap's Mission

To present and create excellent and innovative performing arts programs for the enrichment, education, and enjoyment of diverse audiences and participants.

At Wolf Trap, we value...

- excellence
- innovation
- a broad spectrum of programs
- diversity
- accessible and affordable arts experiences
- our unique environment
- fiscal responsibility
- the creativity of the human spirit
- the power of the arts to change society

Our Vision:

Wolf Trap will harness the power of the performing arts to enrich and change lives by extending the Wolf Trap experience to millions of people worldwide.

Approved by the Board of Directors of the Wolf Trap Foundation for the Performing Arts.

About Wolf Trap

As America's National Park for the Performing Arts, Wolf Trap plays a valuable leadership role in both the local and national performing arts communities. Through a wide range of artistic and education programs, Wolf Trap enhances our nation's cultural life and ensures that the arts remain accessible and affordable to the broadest possible audience.

A typical season at Wolf Trap includes something for everyone with performances ranging from pop, country, folk, and blues to orchestra, dance, theater, and opera, as well as innovative performance art and multimedia presentations.

The Filene Center at Wolf Trap National Park for the Performing Arts

The late Catherine Filene Shouse founded Wolf Trap through a donation of 100 acres of her Vienna, Virginia farmland (near Washington, DC) to the U.S. Government, as well as funds for construction of a 6,800-seat indoor/outdoor theater. The gift was accepted by an Act of Congress in 1966 and Wolf Trap's larger venue, the Filene Center, opened in 1971. The Filene Center season usually runs from the end of May to the beginning of September with an average of 90 performances each year.

The Barns at Wolf Trap

In 1981, Mrs. Shouse also donated the land and funds for an indoor theater constructed of two adjacent 18th century barns, each moved from upstate New York and rebuilt on their present site. The addition of this 382-seat indoor venue created a year-round center for the performing arts.


Photos