Historical Markers

First Oil Well in Tulsa County

Marker is on Southwest Boulevard (Oklahoma Route 66) south of West 41st Street South, in the median.

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Elliott Building

Marker is at the intersection of Cincinnati Avenue and 9th Street, on the right when traveling south on Cincinnati Avenue.

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Oklahoma Natural Gas Company Building

Marker is at the intersection of Boston Avenue and 7th Street, on the right when traveling south on Boston Avenue.

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First Presbyterian Church Centennial

Marker is at the intersection of Boston Avenue and 7th Street, on the left when traveling south on Boston Avenue.

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Pentane (C5H12) Molecular Model

Marker is at the intersection of Boston Avenue and 6th Street, on the right when traveling north on Boston Avenue.

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Philtower Building

Marker is at the intersection of Boston Avenue and 5th Street, on the right when traveling north on Boston Avenue.

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The Gillies



Gilcrease Museum pays tribute to the 13 visionary women who founded The Gillies, a volunteer organization formed in 1967 to serve the many needs of the museum. We salute these community leaders who played such an important role in developing what has become a vital partnership of sustaining support for the museum. May all who visit Gilcrease Museum be inspired by the generosity and commitment of the Gillies and their ethos of service that continues to serve as a model of civic and community engagement.

Marjorie Blocksom • Marian Bovaird • Jancie Daniel • Jean Devlin • Beeb Gannaway • Kay Hardy • Mildred Ladner • Patsy Lyon • Judy Mallory • Nancy Patton • Ann Phaenacie • Ellie Shaughnessy • Joan Stauffer

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Simón Bolívar



Liberator of Venezuela, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, Bolivia and Panamá.
Born: Caracas, Venezuela
July 24, 1783
Died: Santa Marta, Colombia
December 17, 1830

"I prefer the title of Citizen to that of Liberator, because while the latter has its origin in War, the former has been created by the law of the Land."
Simón Bolívar, October 3, 1821

"...Liberator...a name given by both the Old World and the New, to the man whose influence is equaled only by his abnegation and in whose heart is a boundless love of liberty and all-powerful, unreserved devotion to the Republic."
Lafayette, in a letter to Simón Bolívar, dated September 1, 1825.

On May 4, 1991, this statue of Simón Bolívar, by the Venezuelan sculptor Silvestre Chacón, was donated to the city of Tulsa by Petróleos de Venezuela, S.A., in accordance with the recommendation of the Venezuelan Consulate in Houston, Texas.

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Colonial Garden



The Colonial Garden is the third garden in the series of five historic theme gardens.

Colonists claiming the Virginia wilderness brought with them the formal, Dutch-English gardening style prevalent in England during the reign of William and Mary in the late 1800's [sic - 1600s]. The formality and symmetry of Colonial gardens brought a sense of order and familiarity to the untamed land.

Colonial gardens of the affluent were typically laid out in parterre fashion, which means that they designed the beds and paths to form a symmetrical pattern. Garden paths were often constructed of either patterned brick or crushed gravel. Inside the formal parterres flowers, vegetables, fruits, herbs, and flowering shrubs were combined without any kind of organization or separation. Colonial style gardens were both practical and beautiful providing food for the table, herbs for fragrance and medicinal purposes, and cut flowers for enjoyment.

Parterres and paths were traditionally enclosed with either a formal hedge or a picket fence. Hand-clipped hedges or picket fences kept farm animals out of the garden. Gazing globes, sundials, and hand-clipped boxwood topiary were typical focal points in these gardens.

Follow the sidewalk South to the Victorian Garden, the fourth in the series of five theme gardens. The first two gardens in the series, the Pre-Columbian and Pioneer gardens, are located to the North in Stuart Park below the parking lot.

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Creek Nation Council Oak Memorial

Marker is at the intersection of 18th Street and Cheyenne Avenue, on the right when traveling west on 18th Street.

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